Five Political Events that will Impact your MENA Business in 2014

My last post focused on an overlooked topic in the MENA region: business opportunity. This post covers a more popular regional theme: political risk. MNCs must prepare for how the following political events could impact their MENA business performance in order to be successful in 2014:

1.   The next round of Iran nuclear talks beginning on February 18

  • Why it matters: A deal would lead to the opening of MENA’s largest untapped market, while failed talks would shake business and consumer confidence throughout the region.
  • Political context: It is unclear whether a final deal involving Iran’s nuclear program can be reached this year. Decades of an uncoordinated international sanctions policy would be difficult to roll back even with a final agreement, particularly if the process is made into a campaign issue ahead of US congressional elections later this year. 
  • Business impact: Companies without a local presence should manage expectations regarding the pace of market entry if a final nuclear deal is reached; the sanction rollback process could take quite a long time and economic recovery will take longer. Established companies would have a head start against rapidly rising competition, but do not expect an immediate easing of restrictions on critical business activities like repatriating funds.

2.   Algeria’s presidential election, which is scheduled for April 17  

  • Why it matters: Algeria could become a major FDI destination if critical economic reforms are implemented after the election.
  • Political context: Companies should monitor whether President Abdelaziz Bouteflika announces that he will run for a fourth term. While the ruling National Liberation Front (FLN) could field another candidate who would win, Bouteflika’s absence from the election would be seen as a shakeup in the political order, leading to political uncertainty.
  • Business impact: If President Bouteflika decides to run for a fourth term, it could signify his desire to usher in a new economic era that would enshrine his legacy. Economic reforms are badly needed, particularly to ease the process for foreign investment and market entry. Some economic reforms could be aimed at encouraging local production in important sectors such as pharmaceuticals, as the government seeks to reduce its import bill and reorient spending toward local investment.

 3.   The Iraqi parliamentary election, which is scheduled for April 30

  • Why it matters: An election accompanied by significant violence would lead to another year of high business costs and frequent transportation disruptions. However, a modestly successful election could encourage stability and boost substantial business potential.
  • Political context: Politically disaffected Sunnis (and some Shiites) are not motivated to seek change through the ballot box, because they feel excluded from the political process. Low voter turnout and significant violence would further undermine political cohesion and fuel ongoing instability. On the other hand, if the federal government and Sunni tribal leaders cooperate to combat militants in the Anbar province, this could act as a building block to ease tensions ahead of the election.
  • Business impact: An election that is widely seen as a failure will lead to more violence and necessitate companies to ensure contingency plans protect staff and local partners. On the other hand, if the election is seen as a modest success, it could slow down the momentum of ongoing violence. Companies would be in a better position to establish a foothold to build market share and to expand geographically with a sustained improvement to political stability.

 4.   The expiration of the 6-year term of Lebanese President Michel Suleiman in May

  • Why it matters: A new government must be agreed upon before President Suleiman’s departure from office or a worsening security situation would hurt business locally and across the Middle East.
  • Political context: To limit instability, it is critical that a new government is formed before the expiration of President Michel Suleiman’s six-year term in May. Without a functioning government, it has been difficult for Lebanon to contain rising instability since mid-2013. Last Saturday’s car bombing in Hermel, which killed four and injured 30, is the latest example of spill over from the Syrian civil war. The deteriorating security situation cannot be improved without a new government.
  • Business impact: Companies should brace for escalating violence, especially if there is no move towards political consensus. The volatile environment will continue to undermine consumer confidence, depress foreign investment, and raise the cost of doing business. Regionally, ongoing instability contributes to rising competition in the stable GCC region. In addition, if Lebanon becomes more enveloped in the Syria conflict, it threatens to disrupt transportation across the Middle East given the integral role played by the Port of Beirut for accessing nearby markets.

 5.   The announcement of any new Saudi labor regulations during 2014

  • Why it matters: Senior executives rely heavily on the Saudi market for overall MENA growth. Tighter labor regulations could slow down business enough to threaten MENA performance targets in 2014.
  • Political context: The government could tighten labor regulations without more private sector hiring of Saudi nationals, which increased only 4.6% between 2010 and 2012. The labor market must absorb 100,000 Saudi graduates per year and the government is willing to accept short-term economic pain in exchange for a long-term rebalancing of the job market.  Official figures indicate that Saudi Arabia has deported up to 1.25 million of 9 million foreign workers since 2013.
  • Business impact: As a result of the imbalance created by the mass deportations of foreign workers, some construction firms are struggling with higher costs and worker shortages. As a result, banks must deal with an increase in late payments and non-performing loans. More stringent labor regulations would exacerbate this situation and lead to tighter credit conditions, undermining consumer spending and business activity in 2014.

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